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Shorkie puppy
adopted in Clearwater
born 3/11/2022, Black & Gold

Shorkie
Shorkie
Shorkie
Price:
Already Adopted
Breed:
Shorkie
Birth Date:
Gender:
Female
Color:
Black & Gold
Location:
Clearwater
Status:
Sold
ID:
00510935
Shorkie

The Shorkie is a designer hybrid 50/50% between a Yorkshire terrier and a Shih Tzu.

The Shorkie is a hybrid or designer dog breed created by crossbreeding a Yorkshire terrier and a Shih Tzu. This pup inherits the best traits of both parent dogs and is known for being an affectionate, playful, and loving companion. The Shorkie is ideal for families with children and can even get along with other pets. This breed has a soft, silky, allergy-friendly coat that is famous among those who have dog allergies.

Despite their big personalities, Shorkies are small dogs. They generally weigh around 5-12 pounds and stand at 6-11 inches tall. Like most dogs, Shorkie females are slightly smaller than the males, although there is no significant size difference.

Shorkies usually have straight, medium-long coats. Their most common colors are fawn, red, white, black, brown, and tan, but they can come in any color or combination of colors that Yorkshire terriers and Shih Tzus do. You can find Shorkies with bicolor, tricolor, and brindle coats. They have a long, silky topcoat with a soft, cottony undercoat. The hair on their faces is often shorter than their bodies.

Shorkies are known for being highly intelligent, loving, and trainable dogs. They are very easy to potty train and can learn tricks quickly. However, they can also be stubborn and headstrong, so it is important to start training them early. Shorkies are also known for being barkers, so if you are looking for a quiet dog, this may not be your breed.

Like most designer dogs, their appearance is slightly variable, but most Shorkies have the head of a Yorkshire terrier and the body of a Shih Tzu. They have large, dark eyes, long eyelashes, and small triangular ears that stand up straight. Their noses are usually black or brown, and their tails are long and fluffy.

Shorkies generally have a long lifespan. They live between 11-and 16 years on average, although some have been known to live even longer. This breed is generally healthy, but they are susceptible to certain health conditions like all dogs. Some of the most common health problems seen in Shorkies include:

  • Dental problems
  • Allergies such as pollen, chemicals, and specific foods
  • Respiratory issues
  • Congenital liver disease
  • Spinal disc disease
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Lens luxation
  • Patellar luxation

If you take in your Shorkie for checkups and vaccinations, brush their teeth regularly, and feed them a high-quality diet, they should live a long and happy life.

If you are looking for a loving companion dog who will make you laugh and keep you on your toes, the Shorkie is the perfect breed!

History

People often associate the Shih Tzu with China, but it is a Tibetan breed. Tibet was a sovereign nation until the 1950s when China annexed the region. The Shih Tzu was bred in the Tibetan Buddhist monasteries and was considered a holy dog. Tibetan monks gave Shih Tzus as gifts to Chinese royalty and nobles, and they were highly prized.

The Shih Tzu was bred to sit around Chinese palaces and bark at dogs, people, and animals that approached. Since they barked at every unwanted visitor, they served as a warning for the emperor and his family. The Shih Tzu is also thought to be related to the Lhasa Apso, another Tibetan breed.

They were also used as watchdogs and foot warmers. The word "Shih Tzu" means "little lion" in Mandarin, although they are named for their resemblance to a lion in Chinese mythology. The Chinese bred them with Pekingese and Pugs to create the modern-day Shih Tzu.

The Yorkshire Terrier is an English dog breed originally bred to catch rats in cloth mills. Named for the region of England, Yorkshire, these dogs were originally called "Ratteries" or "Toy Terriers." They are most likely a mix of multiple terriers, including the Broken Haired Scotch Terrier, the Paisley Terrier, and the Skye Terrier.

Yorkshire Terriers, also called "Yorkies," were highly skilled at hunting down rodents and were even used by English farmers to control the rat population. They were also good at hunting down animals that lived in underground dens. Hunters would even carry Yorkies with them when hunting for badgers, foxes, and other medium-sized wild animals.

Because of their hunting abilities, Yorkies became well-known and loved for their ferocity and bravery. However, as word got out about their favorable characteristics, more and more people began adopting them as pets.

English royalty began to cherish and praise the Yorkie for its long, beautiful coat and affectionate personality. This shift in breeding eventually led to the development of the modern-day Yorkshire Terrier that we know and love today.

The Yorkshire Terrier was brought to the United States in 1872 and quickly became a popular pet. They were first registered with the American Kennel Club in 1878 and have been one of the most popular breeds ever since.

In recent years, designer dogs have become increasingly popular. A designer dog is a cross between two purebred dogs. These dogs are usually bred for specific characteristics, such as size, coat type, or temperament.

The Shorkie is a cross between the Shih Tzu and the Yorkshire Terrier. They were bred to be small companions with long, flowing coats. Although the American Kennel Club does not recognize them, they are recognized by the Designer Dog Kennel Club and the International Designer Canine Registry.

The Shorkie is a relatively new breed. It has only been in America for around ten years. Nevertheless, they have quickly become a popular choice for people looking for a small companion dog.

Temperament

The Shorkie is a spunky and affectionate little dog. They are known for their lively personalities and their love of play. Like their Shih Tzu parent, they can be yappy and bark at anything that catches their attention. Many people consider Shorkies to be big dogs in small packages. Because Shorkies feel the need to overcompensate for their small size, positive reinforcement training can go a long way in making them feel secure.

Shorkies are also known for being very loving and attached to their owners. They love to cuddle and will often follow their owner around the house. They make great lap dogs and enjoy being close to the people they love.

These dogs are generally good around other animals, although they may try to chase after smaller prey. With early socialization and training, they can learn to get along with other pets in the home.

Shorkies are intelligent dogs that are easy to train. They respond well to positive reinforcement and treat-based training methods. Like all dogs, Shorkies need to be socialized from a young age to ensure that they grow up to be well-rounded adults. We recommend instilling good habits in your Shorkie early on in its life. Because of their personalities, getting rid of bad habits is extremely challenging.

They will love every family member but form the closest bond with their primary caregiver and owner. They are good pets for any household, big or small. However, they are best suited for individuals who can spend lots of time with them because they require attention. Since they don't like to be left alone, they are excellent companions for seniors.

Where will the dog feel best?

Shorkies are small dogs that do well in apartments and other small living spaces. They don't need a lot of room to run around and are content with spending most of their time indoors. However, their tendency to bark at anything that startles them makes them a poor fit for apartment complexes that have thin walls.

As mentioned before, Shorkies are good pets for active seniors. They are also good for singles, couples, and teenagers. They can work well in smaller families, but they sometimes face problems with small children. Although they are generally gentle and good-natured, their small size makes them fragile and susceptible to injury.

Your Shorkie will get along with another dog that it is acquainted with early on, but it may feel territorial around strange dogs. If you have another dog in the house, introduce them slowly and under supervision. They tend to be unaware of their small size and physical limitations, so protect them from bigger dogs.

Because of their coat, Shorkies are well-suited for allergy-prone people. Generally considered hypoallergenic, their fur is less likely to trigger an allergic reaction than other dogs.

Grooming

Shorkies have long, flowing coats that require regular grooming. Their coat is hypoallergenic and does not shed much, making them a good choice for people with allergies. However, their coat does require regular brushing to prevent mats and tangles.

Shorkies should be bathed every two weeks to keep their coat clean and healthy. Use a mild shampoo designed for dogs to avoid drying out their skin. You can use a dry shampoo to keep your Shorkie clean and fresh in between baths.

Their ears should be checked regularly for dirt, wax, and debris. Clean their ears with a cotton ball dampened with a mild ear cleaner. Be careful not to insert the cotton ball too far into the ear canal.

To keep their nails short, trim them every couple of weeks with a dog nail trimmer. If you can hear their nails clicking on the floor, they are too long and must be trimmed.

The primary concern when caring for Shorkies is their oral health. Their small mouths make them susceptible to tooth decay and gum disease. To prevent these problems, brush their teeth daily with dog-safe toothpaste. You can also give them dental chews and treats to help keep their teeth clean.

Visit the vet at least once a year for a checkup and get updated on their vaccinations. Your Shorkie will also need to be spayed or neutered, depending on its gender.

Exercises

The Shorkie is a small dog, but it still needs to exercise to stay healthy. A daily walk is a good way to get them some exercise. However, they shouldn't be walked in areas with heavy traffic because of their small size. You should also keep an eye on them when they are at dog parks. They can be stubborn around bigger dogs, so they may put themselves at risk.

They also enjoy playing fetch and other games that involve running and chasing. Let them run around and play to their heart's content if you have a backyard. Just be sure to provide them with plenty of shade and water to prevent heatstroke.

Since they are small dogs that expend lots of energy throughout the day, 30 minutes of daily exercise should be enough.

Nutrition

A good diet is important for any dog, but it's especially important for small breeds like the Shorkie. Smaller dogs need more calories per pound of bodyweight than larger dogs. This means that they need a higher-quality diet that is packed with nutrients.

The best way to ensure your Shorkie is getting the nutrition it needs is by feeding it a dry kibble that can help keep its teeth strong. Since Shorkies are highly prone to weight gain, stick to a schedule (twice daily works best), measure their food, and avoid overfeeding them. You should also stick to top-rated dog food for small breeds with high energy.

Treats can be given in moderation, but make sure they don't make up more than ten percent of your Shorkie's diet.

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