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Pembroke Welsh Corgi puppy
adopted in Clearwater
born 12/19/2021, Red & White

Pembroke Welsh Corgi
Pembroke Welsh Corgi
Pembroke Welsh Corgi
Price:
Already Adopted
Breed:
Pembroke Welsh Corgi
Birth Date:
Gender:
Male
Color:
Red & White
Location:
Clearwater
Status:
Sold
ID:
03461353
Pembroke Welsh Corgi
Coat length
Grooming difficulty
Shedding intensivity
Barking frequency
Ability to learn
Need for exercise
Small
Family
Happy and Alert

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is known for its distinctive long bodies and short legs.

Corgis make great family pets have great energy and love being around people. Due to the Pembroke Welsh Corgi's history of coming from a life of luxury, the modern-day Corgis still require a good deal of maintenance. Here we'll talk about some of the critical points you need to know about owning a Pembroke Welsh Corgi.

History

Pembroke Welsh Corgis are first discovered in texts as far back as the early 1100s. At the time, Henry I invited Flemish weavers to reside in southwestern Wales, and they brought the beautiful Corgi breed along with them. In the early days, besides serving as companions, the breed was used to herd sheep and cattle.

In the late 1800s, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi became its own breed separate from the Cardigan Welsh Corgi. Pembroke Corgis came from Pembrokeshire, while Cardigan Corgis came from Cardiganshire. The name "Corgi" translates to "dwarf dog" from Welsh, named after its distinctive appearance.

The main difference between the two is the look of their ears and tails. The Pembroke's ears are erect and pointed, while the Cardigan's are rounded. The Pembroke's tail is much shorter than the Cardigan's.

Temperament

Pembroke Welsh Corgis are intelligent and alert. In his book The Intelligence of Dogs, Stanley Coren ranks them as the 11th most intelligent dog breed (out of 130). Corgis are people pleasers and eager to learn. It's worth mentioning, however, that the Corgi is a charming but stubborn breed with a strong personality.

This breed requires a lot of mental stimulation. Corgis will bark more without proper stimulation. This goes along with the positive aspect that Pembroke Welsh Corgis are very social. So, their mental stimulation can be done through socialization with people and other dogs.

Where will the dog feel best?

Pembroke Welsh Corgis are pretty adaptable to many different environments. They do well in heat and cold for reasonable periods of time. Corgis do best in homes kept at a fair temperature, but being herders by nature, they need time outdoors to play and exercise.

It is important to remember that Pembroke Welsh Corgis are high-energy dogs. The breed can become troublesome if not given enough mental stimulation. So, make sure they have attention, toys, and sufficient exercise. This is especially important if they need to be left alone at any point.

Also, keep in mind that living with a Corgi may require a bit of "puppy-proofing" around the home. Keep objects out of reach that you don't want to be mistaken for a toy.

Due to their strong herding instinct, you may find your Corgi running after squirrels, rabbits, and other small animals. Keep a close eye on your pup because they may run off if your yard isn't fenced in.

Pembroke Welsh Corgis do well with young children and other pets. That said, they should be introduced slowly. They are brave little pups and not one to back down, so you'll need to referee and ensure everyone gets along until the dogs get to know each other better. You should also keep in mind the size of your other pets. Corgis are prone to joint issues, so you don't want them being tossed around or trampled by larger dogs.

Pembroke Welsh Corgis can easily become overwhelmed and, although not aggressive, irritable. With proper socialization, however, they can adapt to any family environment.

As mentioned, Corgis do not do well if they need to be left alone most of the time, so if you can't dedicate time to your Corgi, then this probably isn't the breed for you.

Grooming

Pembroke Welsh Corgi coats are fascinating. They are a short-haired breed with a double coat. This means that they have both a top layer and an undercoat. The reason for the double coat is their herding nature. This breed was "designed" to be outside. A double coat helps with temperature regulation throughout the seasons. This keeps them cool during the summer and warm during the winter.

Grooming for double-coated dogs is extremely important. Without proper grooming, your Corgi could become highly matted. Not only is this an eyesore, but it can become quite uncomfortable and even dangerous for your pup's health as well.

The earlier you can get your Corgi exposed to grooming, the better. Ideally, this should start in puppyhood. But no worries, this can be introduced to an adult Corgi if you get your friend later in life. Again, Corgis are very adaptable and eager to please.

Despite being a short-haired breed, Pembroke Welsh Corgis do shed. Breeds with double coats mainly shed during the summer and not so much during the winter. 

Professional grooming is recommended for Pembroke Welsh Corgis every four to eight weeks. However, not everyone has access to professional grooming, so it's also essential to know how to do it at home. Never shave a double-coated dog. This can disturb their temperature regulation and create discomfort regardless of the season.

It's important to bathe your Corgi using a specific shampoo and conditioner made for double-coated dogs. Brush them before bathing to remove loose hair and debris that has built up in their coat. Once the bath is finished, blow-drying them is best. The blow-drying helps blow out loose hair and can also loosen mats that already exist. If they aren't tolerant of blow dryers (some, but not all, dogs are afraid of the noise), towel or air drying is the only option. If you towel dry, do so by pressing on the hair to soak up moisture rather than rubbing. Rubbing the towel over their hair can cause irritation and further matting.

Once their hair is dry, you can brush them again. You will need a specific type of brush called a slicker or a rake for double-coated breeds. These are designed to remove loose hairs from the undercoat and prevent matting between the layers. It is possible to brush out matting but be prepared to be patient. It is a slow process but worth it to avoid having to cut or shave big chunks of hairs off your Corgi.

Even though you probably won't be bathing them every day, you should definitely brush your Corgi daily if possible to prevent matting and eliminate any issues from shedding.

Ear and nail care are essential. Corgi nails should be clipped regularly. For most Corgis, this means every few weeks.

For their ears, you can take a cotton ball or soft rag and gently wipe the outer ears. Be careful not to enter the ear canal since that can cause any debris and wax to go deeper, leading to ear infections.

Exercises

As mentioned, Pembroke Welsh Corgis need their exercise. Exercise needs to increase with age (up to a point). For instance, a three-month-old Corgi puppy should get about fifteen minutes of exercise at a time, while a full-grown Pembroke Welsh Corgi will need at least a couple of walks a day or one long walk, along with other play.

Of course, this all depends on your specific Corgi. Just like humans, they can vary from one pup to the next. If you notice your Corgi getting tired after only thirty minutes, then let them relax. Alternatively, if your Corgi is more energetic than others, be ready to give them their playtime.

Corgis can entertain themselves but prefer activities involving others. Toys are great if they have to be alone for a time. Balls are a good choice for Corgis because they are easy for them to "herd." However, ideal exercises for Corgis would be walks, hikes, playing in the backyard, and other types of interactive activities.

Nutrition

 Nutrition and giving Pembroke Welsh Corgis a healthy diet are essential. Treats are okay for rewards, but they should be given in small portions. Ideally, Pembroke Welsh Corgis should be fed a diet high in protein (22.5% high-quality protein, to be exact). Also, make sure their diet includes plenty of vitamins and minerals. Calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and vitamin A are essential for Corgi's joint health.

Corgi puppies should eat smaller meals more often than Corgi adults. For example, puppies should have four meals a day between two and four months. Between four and six months, they should have three meals a day. They can have two to three meals a day between six and eight months. Over the age of eight months, they should be okay with two meals a day.

Some professionals recommend a combination of wet and dry food for Pembroke Welsh Corgis. Wet foods tend to be higher in calories than dry foods. Of course, always double-check with your veterinarian about your specific puppy's needs.

It's often recommended to use metal water and food dishes versus plastic. Plastic dishes pick up more germs and bacteria than metal. Chemicals from the plastic can also leak into the food and water, creating health problems over a Corgi's lifespan.

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