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Beagle puppy
adopted in Orlando
born 1/14/2022, Lemon

Beagle
Beagle
Beagle
Beagle
Beagle
Beagle
Price:
Already Adopted
Breed:
Beagle
Birth Date:
Gender:
Female
Color:
Lemon
Location:
Orlando
Status:
Sold
ID:
04816638
Beagle
Coat length
Grooming difficulty
Shedding intensivity
Barking frequency
Ability to learn
Need for exercise
Medium
Hunting
Calm

A Beagle puppy or adult dog makes an excellent addition to a loving family. They are pack animals, and they welcome humans and other dogs into the fun-loving pack. Beagles are natural cuddlers. They are naturally affectionate and crave much attention and much activity. If you have more than one Beagle in your family, you'll often find them together in a puppy pile, and they can barely get close enough to those they love.

Beagles are one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States. The hound is a family favorite across all of America and Canada. The pups were initially bred to hunt small prey such as rabbits or hares. When fox hunting became popular, breeders created the Foxhound by crossing a Beagle with a Buckhound. They're a fun addition because they are so curious and loveable. And those big, brown eyes and long silky ears are pretty irresistible.

The Beagle is known to be a happy-go-lucky dog, sure to make you laugh every day. A beagle's sense of smell is extraordinary. They never seem to get tired, although they're not made for long-distance runs. In short sprints, they can reach high speeds… up to 20 miles per hour.

Beagle coloring is a lovely range from lemon, tricolor, white, and red. They have expressive, sweet faces with big brown or hazel eyes and those silky soft long ears set low on its broad-head. The most common is a tri-color coat with a black saddle, white chest, legs, belly, and the very tip of a Beagle's tail. 

The bright white end of the Beagle's tail serves an essential work purpose. The tail sticks straight up in the air when the Beagle is tracking something, so the tip is like a little white flag allowing hunters to follow them when their heads are down, taking in scents.

History

Beagles date back to Roman times, based on historical reports of small pack hounds used to hunt rabbits in and around England before the Roman legions arrived in 55 B.C. The origins of the Beagle name are unclear. Some experts say the Gaelic word "beag," meaning little, could be the likely origin story. However, others say it comes from the French term "be'guel,e" meaning "gape throat" or "loudmouth" after the sound the dogs make while hunting.

By the 1500s, it was common for English gentlemen to maintain two or more packs of hounds. Larger hounds to track deer and smaller ones to chase down rabbits. Those smaller, compact dogs were the ancestors of our beloved modern Beagle. Larger pack hunters such as harriers or foxhounds required hunters on horseback to keep up with the chase. And many couldn't afford to feed and care for a horse in addition to packs of dogs. Especially in hunting circles, Beagles are known as "foot hounds." They can lead the hunt with the hunter on foot rather than on a horse, making it very popular across Europe and North America.

Hunters who are Beagle enthusiasts are called "beaglers." Pointing to the breed's enthusiasm for hunting along with its phenomenal sense of smell, a beagle wouldn't trade their treasured pup for any other breed. Beagles started arriving in America after the Civil War. Immediately, they became popular across the United States as rabbit hunters. In 1885 the American Kennel Club (AKC) recognized the Beagle breed. A Beagle named Blunder was the first.

Temperament

Beagles are excellent family dogs. Their happy-go-lucky personalities make them great pups to have around children and other dogs. Beagles love to play or work almost non-stop. They don't mean to be naughty, but they were bred to pick up a scent and follow it long distances. So they can get single-minded about following a scent wherever it leads.

This determination to never stop can make them challenging to train, but once they get the game of following your commands, they'll view that as their most important work. You'll want to put in the time and effort to train your Beagle puppy well. They generally don't place high up in obedience trials because they simply get distracted or bored. Because once they hit on a scent, they're very hard to call back, which could also be dangerous for your dog. don't

They want to please their people and will work hard to do that. These little bundles of energy are very gentle and outgoing. They're open to meeting new people and animals but won't hesitate to go into protective mode if something seems threatening in any way. They are the opposite of a lone wolf and will enthusiastically join a family that already has pets.

Where will the dog feel best?

Unless you have time to take your Beagle on long walks every day, the pup needs and deserves a large fenced-in backyard to roam and "hunt." What makes them so popular is their love and loyalty to their people, which can have a downside. If you don't give them enough attention, they'll likely protest by howling or tearing something up.

Even though they love exploring the great outdoors, Beagles are indoor dogs that should share the family home. Therefore, they should never be tied down for long periods on a leash unless they're on a fun walk. Their humans should also supervise them to ensure they don't get bored and then mischief. Taking training, playing, cuddling, and long walks will make your Beagle puppy happier and better behaved. So it's a win-win for you both.

Grooming

Beagle's smooth coats are short, shed, but not heavily. The Beagle's dense double coat is waterproof. It thickens up during the winter, so an annual spring shedding is typical.

Using a medium bristle brush or grooming mitt once a week helps to remove loose hair and keep your Beagle's coat shiny and healthy. Regular baths and regular brushing of their teeth are recommended. Keeping their ears clean is an important part of grooming this breed to avoid ear infections.

Their nails should also be trimmed regularly either by you or a groomer. Nails that grow long can be painful and cause the puppy problems when running or even walking.

Exercises

Beagles are high-energy, very smart, and naturally curious. They enjoy attention and action. Plenty of exercise makes them easier to train. Then, their stubborn streak can be focused on good behavior rather than bad. They're small dogs who love their food. Unfortunately, they can become overweight and unhealthy without a regular exercise schedule. Beagle puppies are sure to entertain. The answer to playtime is always yes, and their energy seems limitless right up until they fall asleep, exhausted. When playing, Beagle puppies must not be allowed to make too many high-impact moves because it can damage their still-growing bones and joints.

Beagle puppies do not need as much exercise as adult Beagles. One of their favorite activities will involve putting that fantastic nose to work. So create some scent games to put their snouts and brains to work. Hiding a favorite ball so they can hunt it down is fun for you both. Also, letting the dog play "which hand is the treat in?" is sure to please.

Several activities will make for a happier and more well-behaved beagle. As mentioned, scent work is popular. So are tracking, agility, and swimming. When exercising or training, consider using a long leash so if they do pick up the scent of something more interesting than you at the moment, you can get them to stop and come back.

Beagles make excellent working dogs, and new owners are wise to find a job for their new pup to do, such as playing many rounds of fetch or going on long walks. Otherwise, the puppy will find their own mission in life, and usually, it will be destructive! BU.S. Homeland Security calls its team of working dogs "The Beagle Brigade." because of their fantastic sense of smell, Beagles are often used for security in airports, where they sniff around passenger's luggage for foreign diseases and parasites. In addition, they're excellent bed bug detectors. 

Nutrition

Consult with your veterinarian when deciding what to feed your new puppy or senior Beagle. Generally, high-quality dog food will work well, although home-cooked meals with ingredients your vet has ok'd will work as well. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times. Because Beagles are prone to becoming overweight, watch the calorie consumption, including the treats (and people food). Make sure the diet is age-appropriate and also be aware that Beagles can suffer from allergies, whether to things in the environment or food.

Should your puppy exhibits skin issues due to food, it's worth getting your dog allergy tested to discover what ingredients to avoid. Then you can purchase food based on what they can eat. Also, consult with your veterinarian, but an allergy may be best treated on a fresh food diet. Fresh foods include the best fats and amino acids to ensure your dog stays happy and healthy. But, again, your vet can help you diagnose the issue and develop a Beagle-friendly menu.

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